West Carlston Garden Centre, Campsie Road, Torrance, Glasgow G64 4EZ, Tel: 01360 620248
 

Fruit Information

Looking after established Fruit Bushes and Trees:
You can kick-start your fruit trees and bushes into producing more delicious fruits this year if you feed and mulch them in early spring. Clear weeds from under the branches, using Weedol MAX, then add a plant food to the soil surface to encourage flowering. Miracle-Gro Organic Choice Fruit & Vegetables Plant Food would be the perfect choice. Soft fruits are easy to grow and can produce amazing crops, so why not have a go at strawberries, raspberries or currants if you haven’t before.

Cane supports diagramGrowing Soft Fruits:
As Strawberry plants grow along the ground the fruit can rot easily in very wet weather. To avoid this place straw or "Strawrberry Mats" under the fruit. Alternatively grow in a "Strawberry Pot" or containers to keep them off the ground - there are even alpine varieties that will grow in hanging baskets!
Raspberries come as "canes" and although they can be planted as a shrub you can get better results with a supporting frame as in the diagram on the right.
Blackcurrant, Redcurrant, Whitecurrant, Blackberry, Blueberry, Gooseberry, Tayberry and Loganberry do not require support. Berries need picking regularly. Freeze any excess harvest for the winter months if suited to freezing.

Planting a container grown Fruit Bush:
Dig the soil over well and make a hole twice the width of the container and one and a half times it's depth.
Add a "Rose, Tree & Shrub Compost" or a peat/bonemeal mixture to the hole and fork lightly into the soil in the base of the pit.
Water the container well (soak in a bucket if necessary) and press the soil down firmly, and tap plant out.
Be careful to keep the soil around the root system - if rootbound tease out some of the root system.
Lower the plant into the hole and firm the soil around the plant.
Keep well watered.

Bare rooted plants:
Spread out the roots and dig a hole wide enough and deep enough to accommodate them. fork the soil round the hole to loosen it. Place your plant in the hole and fill in with with soil and a "Rose, Tree & Shrub Compost" mix (or a soil and peat/bonemeal mix).
Keep well watered
.

Planting a container grown Fruit Tree:
Dig the soil over well and make a hole twice the width of the container and one and a half times it's depth.
Add a "Rose, Tree & Shrub Compost" or a peat/bonemeal mixture to the hole and fork lightly into the soil in the base of the pit
Water the container well (soak in a bucket if necessary) and press the soil down firmly, and tap plant out.
Be careful to keep the soil around the root system - if rootbound tease out some of the root system.
Hammer a tree stake into the hole, just off-centre - if your site is very windy a second stake may be necessary.
Lower the plant into the hole and firm the soil around the plant.
Sometimes when trees are supplied in a pot the graft point of the tree may be a little higher than advised. When planting make sure that when the soil has settled the graft lies just above the surface.
Keep well watered.

Bare rooted plants:
Spread out the roots and dig a hole wide enough and deep enough to accommodate them. fork the soil round the hole to loosen it. Place your plant in the hole and fill in with with soil and a "Rose, Tree & Shrub Compost" mix (or a soil and peat/bonemeal mix).
Keep well watered.

Apples Trees:
Apples are the most popular but take care in choosing - Apples Trees are not self pollinating.
Two Apple trees, preferably of different varieties are needed to cross pollinate one another.
The rule is that the two varieties chosen must flower at about the same time or they can't pollinate one
another - so check if the two varieties you are interested in are in the same flowering period.
The two Trees don't have to be in the same garden - if one of your neighbours has an Apple Tree it will
pollinate yours if they flower at the same time.
All the Apple Trees that we sell are in the same flowering group.
RaspberriesGreen GrapesStrawberriesRhubarb
Blackcurrant
Raspberries
Grapes
Strawberries
Rhubarb

BE FRUITFUL

Ideally, fruit bushes should be planted whilst the soil is warm and welcoming. For quick establishment improve soil in the planting hole with Miracle-Gro Soil Improver, it's ideal for planting raspberry canes and blackcurrant bushes. Why not grow some other 'super foods' and give blueberries and black berries a go. They contain antioxidants, packed with vitamin C and are a great source of fibre.


For more information on fruit plants we stock, click boxes below

Fruit Bushes - Fruit Trees - Tomatoes
(Yes the Tomato is a fruit!)


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