West Carlston Garden Centre, Campsie Road, Torrance, Glasgow G64 4EZ, Tel: 01360 620248
 

Rose Information and Tips
(Roses by Mail Order/Internet)
Click on the links below for lists of the varieties that we normally stock in season.


HANDY TIPS
When planting a Rose supplied in a container
Dig the soil over well and open a hole that will accommodate the size of the container.
Water the container well and press the soil down firmly, and tap the plant out.
Be careful to keep the soil around the root system.
Lower the plant into the hole and firm the soil around the plant.
Sometimes when roses are supplied in a pot the union of the rose may be a little higher than advised. When planting make sure that when the soil has settled the union rests on the surface. Keep well watered.
Unless advised otherwise by the supplier it should be assumed that the rose(s) will be in compost that has a slow release fertilizer included. So be careful not to over feed.
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HANDY TIPS
IMPORTANCE OF PRUNING!
Well known rose trade saying "More roses are killed from under pruning than over!"
To give your newly planted roses the best start; it is ESSENTIAL to prune all forms of bush and modern standards hard in the first Spring after planting. I.E. If you plant roses during the Autumn of 2010 prune hard in Spring 2011.
Most roses will have been trimmed (when supplied) to about 30cm (12") - prune in the Spring to within two or three eyes of the crown/union. Some, but not all firms supply roses in the Spring ready pruned. If yours are not pruned; PRUNE!
Annual pruning helps to retain that youthful appearance, and prolongs life! Method of pruning depends on type of roses involved. British Rose Growers Association members will be delighted to give you the advice you require
.
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Looking after Roses:
As well as pruning, mentioned above, Roses require feeding preferably with a good qualitydedicated Rose Fetilizer. Because of all the pruning roses rquire, they need a lot of feeding to provide for the new growth.
Slow release Rose Fertilizer is even better. As the name implies, fertilizer is released in an even controlled manner over a period of time.
Roses are also prone to Aphid attack, especially Greenfly, so check regularly and spray if necessary.
Use a spray such as Roseclear which kills greenfly but not beneficial insects like Ladybirds (which eat Greenfly).
Roses are also prone to fungal infections, especially Blackspot, so check regularly and spray if necessary.
Use a spray such as Roseclear which also kills Blackspot and other common fungi that affect Roses.
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HANDY TIPS
When planting a Rose supplied in a container
Dig the soil over well and open a hole that will accommodate the size of the container.
Water the container well and press the soil down firmly, and tap plant out.
Be careful to keep the soil around the root system.
Lower the plant into the hole and firm the soil around the plant.
Sometimes when roses are supplied in a pot the union of the rose may be a little higher than advised. When planting make sure that when the soil has settled the union rests on the surface. Keep well watered.
Unless advised otherwise by the supplier it should be assumed that the rose(s) will be in compost that has a slow release fertilizer included. So be careful not to over feed.
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THE VERSATILITY OF ROSES
There are roses for every situation
Breeders over the last decade or so, have increased the choice with Patio/Courtyard Climbers that are suitable for the smaller garden where taller and wider climbers are just too big.
Patio roses are slightly taller and bushier than miniature roses. They are an ideal replacement for, and less labour intensive than, bedding plants.
Low maintenance Ground Cover roses, which can be allowed to cover unsightly areas, banks etc.
Modern shrub roses, such as the "English" and Renaissance Roses, which in general are healthier than older shrub roses. They are repeat flowering, mostly very fragrant and their height can often be controlled by pruning. However if you prefer
old-fashioned shrub roses these are also to be found in "Find That Rose!"
Most modern bush roses have longer flowering periods than their predecessors.
Breeders now put disease resistance as a high priority.
Roses are not hard work. If the area is prepared well, and you remember that like people they need to be fed they will give years of pleasure.
Finally there is a rose with a name for every occasion and they make excellent gifts. What nicer gift than a Rose?
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SELECTION OF VARIETIES
Hybrid Tea roses gives you good classical shaped blooms and give you colour but also can be cut for the home.
Floribunda roses are grown mainly to give mass colour effect, as they are born in clusters.
Patio and Miniature roses can be used like bedding plants or where space is limited or for borders and edging.
Ground cover roses are difficult to describe as they go up as well as along the ground. So if you need something to cover an unsightly area or to fall over a bank etc. then seek help in selecting the right variety.
Various shrub roses are listed under their specific classifications and can be grown as specimens on their own or in mixed borders. Some only have limited flowering periods so make sure you select the right variety.
Breeders are producing more and more modern shrub roses, many of which come under the "heading" of "English Roses" but others are listed just as shrub. They have the best of both worlds, old-fashioned blooms, in general they are healthier and often have repeat flowering. They can be planted in groups for good colour effect, or again in a mixed border.
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Types of Rose:
There are so many new categories of Rose nowadays that it can be confusing. The main ones are:

Celebration Roses:
these are all named after "special occasions" such as wedding anniversaries or birthdays. The growers do this as an extra encouragement to buy them as presents but these new varieties are genuinely very nice.

Memorial Roses:
similar to above but with a memorial theme. Again thay are very nice and a rose is a very fitting way to remember someone special.

Recommended Roses: These tend to be newer varieties
and may be subject to a grower's royalty making them a bit more expensive.

Traditional Roses: as the name suggests these are older well loved varieties (and for good reason).


Patio Roses:
These are newer more compact varieties. The flowers may be smaller but as they flower profusely, who cares?

Climbers/Ramblers:
These do just as they say on the labelmbers do well growing up walls or along fences. Ramblers tend to be the old fashioned varieties that do better along fences rather than growing up walls.

Standard Roses:
These are roses buds grafted onto to dwarf tree stock. The overall effect is of a Rose growing on top of a stalk. There is a bit of work in the grafting process so they tend to be expensive, but well worth it, as they are spectacular in tubs or as a centrepiece. Remember to take off any suckers growing on the stem.

If we don't have your Rose in Stock it may be
available by Mail Order through:

Greenhead Nursery,
Old Greenock Road,
Inchinnan,
Renfrew PA4 9PH

Tel: 0141 812 0121
e-mail: sales@rosesscotland.co.uk
Web site: www.rosesscotland.co.uk
red rose animation
Click on the links below for lists of the varieties that we normally stock

I hope you find these information sheets helpful as a basic guide.

West Carlston Garden Centre & Tea Room, Campsie Road, Torrance, Glasgow, G64 4EZ
Tel: 01360 620248 -:- e-mail: info@westcarlston.com